A Whole-House Plan for Energy Savings: How All Parts of the HVAC System are Involved – Sobieski Services | DE, NJ, PA, MD

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A Whole-House Plan for Energy Savings: How All Parts of the HVAC System are Involved

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Although HVAC systems are becoming increasingly more energy efficient, they’re still the biggest energy consumers in homes. It is possible, however, to increase energy savings at home to reduce the work load of your cooling and heating system. Doing so results in lower energy bills, longer system life, and a consistently more comfortable home.

Heat Transfer is the Culprit

Heat constantly moves to colder temperatures and the movement of heat plays a major factor in determining the size of the HVAC system you use. Homes that resist the movement of heat need less cooling and heating, and those that have readily allow heat movement require larger systems.

In the HVAC industry, the heating load of a home is the sum of how well its structural parts work together to resist heat transfer. These parts include:

  • Insulation. Adequate insulation throughout the home’s envelope takes a burden off your HVAC system. A well-insulated home resists heat movement, which drops energy costs and reduces the size of system you need.
  • Air infiltration. Cracks and gaps in your home’s exterior add up quickly. Air easily moves between the indoors and outdoors and increases how much your HVAC system runs. Sealing leaks is usually the least expensive and easiest way to increase energy savings.
  • Windows. Energy Star and thermal-rated windows go a long way toward lowering the heat load. Glass by itself has almost no ability to stop heat transfer.

Making Improvements

Increasing attic insulation and sealing air leaks lower the heating load and are among the easiest ways to improve home efficiency for years to come. Window upgrades also improve efficiency, but if they’re not in the budget, thermal window coverings will cut heat gain and loss when used consistently during hot and cold weather.

Home improvements that contribute to energy savings take a burden off your HVAC system. To learn more, contact Sobieski Services, Inc. We want to help our customers in New Jersey, Delaware, Pennsylvania and Maryland learn more about plumbing and HVAC issues to help them live in healthier, more efficient and comfortable homes.

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